Tag Archives: Outside

Tis The Season…For Great Travel Books!

One of the very cool images from Safari: A Photicular Book.

One of the very cool images from Safari: A Photicular Book.

The world is a book, and those who do not travel read only one page.
–St. Augustine

It’s the Christmas season. It’s also a time when gift giving gets a bit stressful. But hey, why makes things hard on yourself? If you’ve got people in your life who love to travel—whether they’re friends or customers—there are plenty of goodies out there that’ll bring a smile to their face and give them fresh ideas. The best part is, you don’t have to go far to find them. They’re most probably right in your neighborhood or just a click away. Inspiration is everywhere but it’s especially nice when it comes gift-wrapped, so here are a few hints to make your life easer:

Published last year, Safari: A Photicular Book is stunning. I’d like one myself! It was created with something called Motion Viewer design that brings the images on the page to life. It’s an eye-catching book and a great educational tool for children or just about anyone who loves animals. It might even inspire safari travel and how cool would that be?

Anyone with a love for photography will lose themselves in the black and white imagery in Genesis. Sebastião Salgado’s eight-year photo project that he calls his “love letter to the planet.” From South America to the Sudan, he traveled to over 32 destinations, mostly by foot, to capture the most incredible images.  Within this book anyone can explore Earth’s untouched regions. A great escape.

I’ve got a friend who’s determined to visit every national park in the U.S. If you have one too, then you might want to put this on your gift list. America’s National Parks is a treasure that springs to life in your hands. This pop-up picture book is fun, beautiful and educational. Even better, a portion of the book’s proceeds go directly to the National Parks Conservation Association, so you’re really giving two gifts. Just looking at it will have you jonesing for an Airstream trailer.

Keeping in line with gifts that keep on giving, how about magazine subscriptions? For just twenty bucks or less, they also make a great stocking stuffer. Depending on which one you choose, they’re mailed monthly or quarterly which is a nice treat for the lucky recipient. My picks are AFAR, National Geographic Traveler, Outside, or Travel + Leisure. If these magazines don’t inspire travel, I don’t know what will!

Tis the season, so spread the wealth and please contribute any literary travel gift ideas you’ve got up your sleeve.

Let’s get people in the air, on the waves, road, rails, and trails.

Cheers!

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What’s On Your Nightstand?


Reading on the Beach

Reading on the Beach (Photo credit: cmcgough)

The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.”
Dr. Seuss, I Can Read With My Eyes Shut!

What was the first book you read as a kid?  I don’t mean the first book your mom or dad read to you but the first book that you read.  You know, the first one that you actually enjoyed because something about it clicked for you.  The one that did it for me was The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton.   I think most kids read this book but in case you didn’t, it’s a coming of age story about two teenage rival gangs from opposite sides of the tracks. The book is loaded with emotion and it was easy to identify with the characters. I savored every page and didn’t want it to end.  The bonus was finding out that S.E. Hinton was a woman—actually she was a teenager when she wrote the novel—and the story’s narrator is a boy.  In fact, the majority of characters are boys.  That pretty much blew me away.  It was my first real understanding about a writer’s voice and style.  It also led to a greater understanding that to write, you need to read.

Do you like to read? I hope so because reading is probably one of the most important things that will contribute to being a writer—and a good one.  The two pretty much go hand-in-hand.   I’m not talking about just reading travel writing.  I’m talking fiction, non-fiction, newspapers, and print or digital magazines.  If you drive to work, audiobooks make it easy to plow through books. They also make great cooking and workout companions.

Forest Hills Audio Book Month Display

Forest Hills Audio Book Month Display (Photo credit: mySAPL)

The reason I’m asking is because no matter what it is that you read, you’re learning.  Whether you realize it or not, you’re learning the art of writing in its many forms and styles—good and bad.  Much like some people have an ear for music, reading helps to develop an inner ear for writing.   If you find that you pretty much read the same type of literature, step out of that comfort zone and explore other genres.   See what’s out there.

Many times, what you may be reading at a certain point in time can trigger an idea for a story.  I’m not an architect, financial analyst or a man, but when I’m in a doctor’s office waiting room, I flip through the magazines geared towards those subjects to check out what’s happening.  I usually come away having learned a few new things and, oftentimes, an inspired thought for something I’d like to write.

reading by the fountain

reading by the fountain (Photo credit: jaroslavd)

The beauty of reading is that you can do it anywhere, and e-book readers, audiobooks and laptops make it easier than ever to access information.  These days, there’s almost no excuse not to read.  Much like the handy notebook to jot down your ideas and observations, it’s always good to have a book or other type of reading material with you.  Maybe you already do.  A Kindle is great but, like smartphones, they’ll eventually run out of juice.  Like the notebook and pencil, books are loyal travel companions wherever you may be.  I recently spent two hours in line at immigration at JFK airport.  Every once in a while when I looked up from my book, I heard people moaning and groaning about the wait.   If I hadn’t had my book, I’d have been flipping out right along with them.

Con el Kindle en todas partes

With a Kindle everywhere.  (Photo credit: edans)

Similar to travel writers whose columns you admire,  you may have already adopted a certain style of writing cultivated from your favorite authors.  That’s a good thing, because it may have already contributed to helping you define your writing style.  If you don’t read a lot then you may want to pay a visit to your local library where you can easily borrow all types of materials, including audiobooks. It also happens to be Celebrate National Library Weekanother good reason to visit.  Oddly enough, today marks the launch of the Digital Public Library of America which makes books, images, historical records, and audiovisual materials available to anyone with Internet access.  If you prefer to buy your own, there’s no need to spend tons of money when there’s plenty of used books stores around—you can even get them on Amazon.com. I don’t want to burst your bubble, but it’s kind of a cardinal rule to writing.  If you want to write—and write well—you’ve got to read…a lot.

Stephen Kings says, “The real importance of reading is that it creates an ease and intimacy with the process of writing; one comes to the country of the writer with one’s papers and identification pretty much in order.”   As far as I’m concerned, that pretty much sums it up.

Screen Shot 2013-04-17 at 12.42.30 PMRight now I’ve got the current issue of Outside magazine in my handbag and can’t wait to tear into it.  The Liar’s Club by Mary Karr is on my nightstand.  What are you reading or listening to these days?  I’d really like to know.